Feb
10
Stirling Brig Lyrics and Origins
 

This song tells the story of the Battle of Stirlin Brig, In 1297, English forces under the Earl of Surrey and Hugh de Cressingham moved north to put down a revolt in Scotland, English confidence was high and Surrey was expecting a short campaign. Opposing the English was a new Scottish army led by William Wallace and Andrew de Moray. On September 11, 1297, Surrey’s English and Welsh archers crossed the narrow bridge but were recalled as the earl had overslept. Later in the day, Surrey’s infantry and cavalry began crossing the bridge.

Watching this, Wallace and Moray restrained their troops until a sizable, but defeatable, English force had reached the north shore. When approximately 5,400 had crossed the bridge, the Scots attacked and swiftly encircled the English, gaining control of the north end of the bridge. Among those who were trapped on the north shore was Cressingham who was killed and butchered by the Scottish troops. Unable to send sizable reinforcements across the narrow bridge, Surrey was forced to watch his entire vanguard be destroyed by Wallace and Moray’s men.

One English knight, Sir Marmaduke Tweng, managed to fight his way back across the bridge to the English lines. Others discarded their armor and attempted to swim back across the River Forth. Despite still having a strong force, Surrey’s confidence was destroyed and he ordered the bridge destroyed before retreating south to Berwick.

Yah de lum dum dah, yah de lum de diddly dum,
Yah de lum dum dah, yah de lum de diddly dum,
Yah de diddly dum dah, yah de diddly dum diddly dum,
Yaddle de dum de dah, yaddle diddle dum de diddly dum,

Doon by Stirling brig, the Wallace lay in hiding,
As the English host fae the south came riding.
Loud the river Forth ‘tween them baith was roaring,
Rumbling at its sides, o’er the brig o’ Stirling.
Watching fae the woods, the Wallace and the Moray,
As the English come with the Earl o’ Surrey.
Ain by ain they crossed. Oh, the brig was rumbling,
As they onward came, o’er the brig o’ Stirling.

Yah de lum dum dah, yah de lum de diddly dum,
Yah de lum dum dah, yah de lum de diddly dum,
Yah de diddly dum dah, yah de diddly dum diddly dum,
Yaddle de dum de dah, yaddle diddle dum de diddly dum

The Wallace gave a shout. Oot his men came running,
Stubbed the English host, at the brig o’ Stirling.
Cressingham turned round. The brig was small and turning.
Moray cut him doon on the brig o’ Stirling.
Aw the English men ran into each other.
Nane could turn aboot. nane could gae much further.
Some fell o’er the side, in the forth was drowning.
Some were left to die on the brig o’ Stirling.
Surrey he was wild, couldnae ford the river,
Wished wi’ all his might that the brig was bigger.
Then he ride awa’. Loud the man was cursing.
He’d lost all his men and the brig o’ Stirling.

Yah de lum de dah, Yah de lum de dah
Yah de lum de dah, Yah de lum de diddly dum
Yah de lum de dah, Yah de lum de dah
Yah de lum de dah, Yah de lum de dah

 

 


 

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